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May 01, 2005

Comments

Jennifer

Delurking to say that I have a friend who I just adore, but is also kind of scatterbrained. He once locked himself out of his house WITH his toddler and it was getting a little cold. Instead of walking the 3 minutes to a convenience store to call his wife, or a friend who lives 5 min away, he, get this, broke down the back door (he is scatterbrained, but large).

chip

hmmm... you don't have chinese delivery or pizza delivery around there?

I think I read somewhere (can't remember where) that creative-type people are by nature scatter-brained and absent-minded. So would you really want a husband who remembers everything and is perfect in that small way, but who was totally lacking in creativity? (and no he did not pay me to say this). Your rant does sound vaguely familiar...

Figlet

Oh I have one too. And your post is so timely! J left on business this morning. I haven't done the rounds to see what he forgot this time but there's always something. Palm pilot? Laptop cord? Toothbrush? My favorite was the morning I got a call from security at LaGuardia that J had left his cel phone on the x-ray machine. His phone is his life. The security guy actually ran down to the gate to return it to him. If J. was locked out, he wouldn't have waited on the stoop for me to come home, and he wouldn't have thought to go to a payphone. He would have figured out a way to get onto the roof and down the fire escape in the back in order to get to the key that's hidden out back. Because when he does something really spacy, he prefers to get REALLY creative to solve the problem to show how absolutely brilliant he is.

Figlet

Oh and when I said "how absolutely brilliant he is", I was rolling my eyes big time. Not at all implying that your beloved is less than brilliant.

Jo

Yep...got one too. Not going to criticise this week given the circumstances but normally...OH MY GOD. And it's hereditary. C's daughter E is even worse and as the daughter of divorced parents who tend to ask her to pass important messages about things like, oh, collecting her from school say, usually ends up causing much last-minute panicking and tearing out of hair. It makes my teeth hurt to watch it in action. Oh the tales I could tell. If I wasn't far too kind, forgiving and tolerant. Ahem...

Olsen

Lies.

Whatever contribution Tracie El Nido might add to this empathy fest...

All lies.

Cagey

I always tell my hubby he reminds me of the absent-minded professor. Incredibly intelligent and can remember the most trivial of details when it comes to work or business. But, could he remember to pick up his cell phone from the table at the airport after having eaten a meal? or to retrieve from the rental car before returning it? or from the hotel room before checking out? Nope. Nada. Zip. Not that I am taking sides, since I read your hubby's blog, too.

Tracie

Ha! I wasn't going to say anything but now that my husband brought it up, Mr. Mortimer's Mom sounds a lot--A LOT--like my Olsen! Har! In all fairness, I am guilty of slinging a few harsh names in the direction of my spouse too. Nothing I am proud of...but polite and constructive never come to mind when you are that tired and frustrated. This post made me laugh--a lot!

c

I think I can top this...two Christmas eves ago, we were at a Major Airport about five hours from our home, preparing to board a plane to Stockholm, when the ticketing agent says to me, "Wow, you look very different from this picture." I thought it was an odd comment to make until we realized that she was looking at *my husband's passport from 20 years ago, when he was about 9*.
He had picked up the wrong one. The helpful ticket lady booked him on a plane back to our hometown to gather his regular passport, leaving me to spend Christmas eve in the airport's Red Carpet Club, tossing back the drinks and hoping he really did know where his passport was so that he could fly back to me and we could catch the later flight to Stockholm. Long story short(ish), he didn't find it. And we didn't go. We used the airline credit a year later for a different trip. A few embarrassed weeks later he found that it was in another pocket of the travel pouch thing he had been wearing the *whole time*. He has never lived this one down, and never shall. Lucky for him that this is so out of character for him that I mostly felt sorry for him rather than choking him to a brutal death, which, according to the reactions of most of my friends, would have been warranted.

c

I think I can top this...two Christmas eves ago, we were at a Major Airport about five hours from our home, preparing to board a plane to Stockholm, when the ticketing agent says to me, "Wow, you look very different from this picture." I thought it was an odd comment to make until we realized that she was looking at *my husband's passport from 20 years ago, when he was about 9*.
He had picked up the wrong one. The helpful ticket lady booked him on a plane back to our hometown to gather his regular passport, leaving me to spend Christmas eve in the airport's Red Carpet Club, tossing back the drinks and hoping he really did know where his passport was so that he could fly back to me and we could catch the later flight to Stockholm. Long story short(ish), he didn't find it. And we didn't go. We used the airline credit a year later for a different trip. A few embarrassed weeks later he found that it was in another pocket of the travel pouch thing he had been wearing the *whole time*. He has never lived this one down, and never shall. Lucky for him that this is so out of character for him that I mostly felt sorry for him rather than choking him to a brutal death, which, according to the reactions of most of my friends, would have been warranted.

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